Applecore…

Scored 50 lbs. of apples from Aunt Netty and Uncle Vinnie.  They have two apple trees on their property: a Golden Delicious and a Granny Smith.  The “Golden Tree” (Aptly named I think) was LOADED with apples.  We picked about 60 lbs. of apples in a matter of 10 minutes!  So what to do with this load of apples?  Definitiley some apple jelly, apple cider and I am thinking of making apple butter.  The only bad part of apple butter is the amount of time required: 16 hours!  We’ll see what happens…

I made cider last night I thought I would share my recipe:

Get yourself about 10 lbs. of apples for a gallon of cider

First, get yourself about 10 lbs. of apples for a gallon of cider

Chop roughly

Remove core and stems, leaving skin on, then chop roughly

Add 1/4 cup of simple syrup (sugar and water, heated until sugar is dissolved) per 5 cups of chopped apples and then puree for about 1 minute

Then puree chopped apples for about 1 minute in blender. If you need/want your cider sweeter, add 1/4 cup of simple syrup (equal parts sugar and water, heated until sugar is dissolved) per 5 cups of chopped apples.

I had to do about 6 batches as my blender holds five cups of apples. 10lbs of apples = 30 cups roughly chopped

I had to do about 6 batches as my blender holds five cups of apples. 10lbs of apples = 30 cups roughly chopped.

Then pour puree through strainer once and then the left over mash through either a cheesecloth or what I have- a flour sack towel (indispensable) let sit for a couple of hours to completely drain.

Then pour puree through strainer once and then place the left over mash in either a cheesecloth or what I have- a flour sack towel and let sit for a couple of hours to completely drain.

Pour into container and refridgerate.  Drink within a week and do not let pregnant women or babies drink since it is not pastureized.  You can pastureize by heating to 165°F, though at the loss of flavor. Refrigerate, then drink within a week and do not let pregnant women or babies drink since it is not pasteurized. You can pasteurize by heating to  165°F, though at the loss of flavor, but it will also keep for about 3 weeks.

 

 Now I need to decide what to do with the other 40 lbs. of apples!

Sunday Brunch

So after my amazing experience at Sideboard in Danville I decided to peruse the internet for a recipe for what they called their Breakfast Pudding.  Sure enough, after a couple days of investigative work, looking and reading about the dish in the Joy of Cooking and searching all through the internet, I found something that could possibly rival the delectableness of it.  So I decided that I would make Whitney and I a nice Sunday Brunch.  We had boiled Yukon gold potatoes with a Garlic and Shallot Aioli, what they call breakfast pudding I am calling “Crustless Quiche” (technical term Timbale) and orange juice and grenadine spritzers (Couldn’t do champagne, since she had to work).  The meal was excellent and everything was really nice.  A great way to start a Sunday!

September 13 2009 001

I of course deviated from the initial recipe, (mainly because it calls for asparagus, and it is not in season, and because I always want to do it my way) so here is Nick Crespo’s recipe for Crustless Quiche, Baked Eggs, Timbale, Breakfast Pudding or whatever the hell you want to call it:

Crustless Quiche

(Serves 4 people in individual ramekins)

7 eggs

1/2 cup of milk

8 strips of cooked bacon, chopped roughly

1/4 cup of drained, steamed, chopped spinach

1/4 cup of shredded cheese (Could be extra sharp cheddar, gruyère, or goat cheese)

1/4 cup of shredded parmesan cheese (I use Parmigiano Reggiano) 

Salt & Pepper (about 1 teaspoon of salt and 1/4 teaspoon of pepper plus additional cracked pepper before being served)

Whisk eggs and milk thoroughly, and then mix all ingredients together and place in individual six-ounce ramekins.  Place in hot water bath (roasting pan filled with water almost to lip of ramekins) and bake for about 45 minutes to an hour, in a 375° degree oven.  The dish is done when a ramekin is jiggled and the mixture no longer trembles (or you can stick a knife in the middle of one and take a look if cooked through).  Careful when taking them out of the hot water bath!  Happy cooking!